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 Alva Clarke
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Alva Clarke

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St. Lucian by birth, Alva Clarke began his broadcasting career in 1954 as a programme assistant and later as Deputy Programme Director and News Editor with the Windward Islands Broadcasting Service (WIBS) in Grenada when it was launched in 1954.Clarke’s entry into broadcasting followed a stint in print journalism as a Sports Editor and political reporter with the Voice newspaper in St. Lucia. Broadcasting took him to London where he freelanced with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) following which he returned to the Caribbean and became the Federal Broadcasting Officer of the West Indies Federation. He spent a year in this position and then travelled to Ethiopia in 1959 where he served as a Broadcast Adviser to the government there. He returned from the turbulence which befell that country to the BBC in London in 1961 as a producer, and was elevated to the position of senior producer, assuming responsibility for the BBC‘s daily short wave transmission to the region, “London Calling the Caribbean”. He was seconded by the BBC to organise the 8th biennial conference of the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association (CBA) in Jamaica in 1970 which proved to be an auspicious occasion for the CBU, as it was at that particular meeting that the CBU came into existence. Clarke would also become Secretary General of the CBA that year, a post he would hold for 22 years during which he travelled to all the continents of the world serving broadcasting organisations in 51 countries. Clarke was an eager supporter of Caribbean regional integration paying close attention to the media’s possible contribution to the movement, endorsing and supporting the proposal made in 1969 for the formation of an association of Caribbean broadcasters.In the very early 1990’s following his tenure with the CBA, Clarke took a relatively brief respite from the United Kingdom to return to his native St. Lucia as General Manager of the St. Lucia Broadcasting Corporation. After a short stint as head of the national broadcaster of his homeland he returned to London where he died in 1994. Throughout his life Clarke remained a loyal friend, adviser and supporter of the Union - ensuring the CBU Annual General Assembly was on his calendar for attendance no matter which corner of the world he was - advocating the interests of the Caribbean broadcasting and channelling assistance for its advancement. Alva Clarke was inducted posthumously into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.
 Dwight Whylie
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Dwight Whylie

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Dwight Whylie was born in Kingston Jamaica in 1936. In 1961, he was the first announcer of colour to be hired by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for its domestic services. Upon his return home after more than a decade of service in the UK, he took up the position of manager of the Jamaican Broadcasting Corporation (JBC) from 1973 to 1976. In 1977 he became the first black announcer to be employed full-time by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation where he worked for twenty (20) years. For more than a decade he was the editor of the national radio news for the CBC, only breaking that appointment to take up a year-long fellowship at the University of Chicago. He also made a significant contribution to the profession as a broadcasting techniques and journalism trainer throughout the Caribbean. He served as Vice President of the Caribbean Broadcasting Union, the Caribbean Advertisers Association and the Caribbean Publishing and Broadcasting Association. His service to the CBU also included acting as Chief Judge for the Caribbean Broadcasting Awards on many occasions. He became Chairman of the Broadcasting Commission in his homeland Jamaica, and presided over the launch of the first ever indigenously researched and formulated comprehensive set of content standards for broadcast and cable services in the region, the Children’s Code for Programming. He served as Chairman of the Commission until his death in September 2002.Dwight Whylie was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.
Hugh Cholmondeley
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Hugh Cholmondeley

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The late Hugh Cholmondeley could be considered the father of the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU). He entered the media profession in 1958 at the then British Guiana Broadcasting Service as an announcer. There, he showed great skill in learning all facets of his job including both announcing and operating skills, which classified him as “the first and original DJ” according to his eulogist Nigel Hughes. From 1966-1968 he served as Director of News and Current Affairs at Radio Demerara and in 1968 he became the first General Manager of the competitor Guyana Broadcasting Service (GBS). During his time at GBS, he worked diligently to help establish the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU) to bring the region closer together through joint and shared programming by radio and television stations. Due in large part to his efforts, the CBU was officially inaugurated in November 1970 in Georgetown, Guyana and he was appointed the first ever director general, a post later renamed Secretary General. The early emphasis was on radio in the Caribbean. Apart from the numerous training programmes for Caribbean broadcasters, Cholmondeley also led teams to produce two memorable series of programmes: Project One: documentaries on individual CARICOM member countries and Project Two: one-on-one interviews with sitting Heads of Government. He expanded the remit and output of the CBU from offices at the CARICOM Secretariat in Georgetown Guyana, and doubled this effort with a special CARICOM project to promote a food and nutrition strategy developed by the integration movement to boost regional food production and reduce the regional food import bill. In 1972 he was appointed Project Manager of UNESCO where he designed and established the Caribbean News Agency (CANA) and the Caribbean Institute of Mass Communications (CARIMAC) at the University of the West Indies (UWI). In 1977 he was transferred to UNESCO Paris as a Programme Specialist where he designed and administered communications and development projects for the establishment and expansion of news agencies in developing countries. In 1979 he became UNESCO’S representative to the Caribbean, and established his office in Jamaica where he functioned until 1985, when he was instrumental in forming the Consortium Graduate School in the Social Sciences in the Caribbean, a multi-university enterprise comprising University of the West Indies, University of Guyana and University of Suriname. He changed UN hats in 1985 and joined the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), serving firstly in Jamaica and then in New York, where his accomplishments included assisting in peace making and rehabilitation initiatives in trouble spots - Somalia and Liberia - and he also played a key role in relief efforts in Jamaica when the island was decimated by Hurricane Gilbert. He was also a member of election observer missions in countries including Trinidad and Tobago and even his homeland Guyana. Hugh Cholmondeley was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.
Jones P. Madeira
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Jones P. Madeira

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Jones P. Madeira was born in the east Trinidad town of Arima in 1944. He began his career as an amateur broadcaster with the Voice of Rediffusion, a wired radio channel of the Trinidad Broadcasting Company which also operated the Radio Trinidad station. His first professional position in journalism was in the print media as a reporter with the Trinidad Publishing Company, publishers of the Guardian newspapers. He entered broadcasting full-time as a News Editor/Reporter with the state-owned National Broadcasting Service. From there he received a fellowship and became a producer with the Overseas Regional Services of the BBC, broadcasting out of Bush House, London. Madeira returned home and re-joined NBS 610 as Senior Producer, News and Current Affairs, and along with a team of young broadcasters, introduced and produced a range of news and current affairs initiatives. In 1976, he moved on to the position of Adviser in Media Relations and Public Information at the Secretariat of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), and part of a UNESCO team, headed by CBU founder, Hugh Cholmondeley, responsible for promoting the Caribbean integration movement. Their work included the further development of the Caribbean News Agency (CANA) and the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU), and the expansion of the cooperation of electronic media houses in the Caribbean in the areas of programme production and exchanges, engineering and broadcast training. After five years in this position, Madeira assumed the position as the first full-time Secretary General of the CBU from 1981 to 1982. After a short stint in the state sector, he re-entered mass media as Head of News and Current Affairs of Trinidad and Tobago Television (TTT). In July 1990 he became a key hostage during an attempted coup in Trinidad and Tobago having firstly to announce the insurgency to the national population with gunmen and the leader of the militants at his side on the set, and subsequently, having to undertake a number of appearances to keep the country abreast. During his tenure at the TTT, he pioneered several major regional broadcast projects as a member of the Board of the CBU, including the CARIBVISION Project which undertook daily satellite exchanges among regional television systems, live productions of major events in many Caribbean capitals, and the CARIBSCOPE Television Magazine, which became the prototype of a transcription television program exchange in the Caribbean. Following TTT, he again diversified his career by becoming Manager, News and Current Affairs and Caribbean Relations of the Trinidad Broadcasting Company, and Editor in Chief of the Trinidad Publishing Company Limited. He resigned his position as Editor in Chief of the Guardian newspapers along with the majority of his Senior Editorial Team during a confrontation with the government and publishers over freedom of the press, and became one of the pioneers of a new but now defunct newspaper, the Independent. He then moved into public health communication, serving as Information Adviser at the Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC). After almost a decade in that position, he moved to the position as Manager/Adviser of the Communication Unit of the Trinidad and Tobago Ministry of Health, and subsequently became Court Protocol and Information Manager of the Judiciary of Trinidad and Tobago. In 2014 he assumed the post of Editor-in-Chief at the daily newspaper Newsday. Jones P. Madeira was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2000.
Ken Gordon
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Ken Gordon

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Kenneth “Ken” Gordon, born in 1930, was the first black radio announcer in Trinidad and Tobago and, soon after, the first native-born Programme Director at Radio Trinidad.He became the first black president of the Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1960. His entrepreneurial ability was applied to reconstruct a number of Caribbean newspapers. He eventually became the managing director of Trinidad Express Newspaper in 1969, considered the first truly indigenous national newspaper in Trinidad and Tobago.He had conceptual and nurturing roles in the formation of regional media institutions, most notably the Caribbean News Agency.He was instrumental in introducing the first private television station in the English Caribbean, CCN TV6, and Prime Radio, in 1991. This company later joined Barbados Nation Corporation Group to create One Caribbean Media Limited in 2006.Recognition for his service to the media has come from numerous regional and international bodies including The Pedro Joaquin Chamorro Award In 1983 from the Inter American Press Association; The Commonwealth Press Union Lord Astor Award In 1985 and the Media Association of Trinidad And Tobago’s Service Recognition Award in 1997.Ken Gordon was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2000.
Lester Spalding
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Lester Spalding

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J.A. Lester Spalding was born in Jamaica on April 1, 1941. His career in broadcasting is associated with the Jamaica Broadcasting Company, then renamed Radio Jamaica and Rediffusion Limited and subsequently Radio Jamaica Limited which eventually became the parent company of the RJR Communication Group. Starting in accounts, he became Managing Director in 1978, a position from which he retired in 2008. He has been Chairman of the Radio Jamaica Group since 1994. He was president of the CBU from 1987 to 1991. During his term as President he formed a relationship with the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung which led to the establishment of a television production and news exchange facility including the CBU’s acquisition of its own domestic satellite uplink. He also contributed to the development of the Caribbean News Agency (CANA) as a director until 2011, and nurtured the formation of the Caribbean Media Corporation being its inaugural Chairman in 2000. Lester Spalding was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2011.
Olga Lopes-Seale
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Olga Lopes-Seale

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Dame Olga Lopes-Seale was born in Guyana on December 26, 1918. In 1952 she started full-time radio broadcasting with Radio Demerara where she was the first Guyanese woman to become a news anchor. Her warm and friendly voice along with her caring personality made her extremely successful with programmes such as “Yours Truly, Olga”, as well as her Children’s Talent Shows. She also launched the Radio Demerara Needy Children’s Fund. This fund sought to meet the needs of poor children across Guyana. She moved to Barbados in 1963 and became synonymous with community broadcasting at Barbados Radio Rediffusion. There she launched the Rediffusion Needy Children’s Fund. She also became known for her Saturday morning children’s radio programme where many a talent was born and cultivated. In 1961 Olga was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire for her humanitarian work and for her contribution to broadcasting in Guyana. In 2005 she was made a Dame of St. Andrew in the Barbados Independent Honours for extraordinary and outstanding achievement and merit in service to Barbados and humanity at large. While Olga was known and respected as a world class broadcaster, it was her work with the poor and indigent, her indefatigable spirit that resonated with Barbadians, she and her small band of volunteers on a daily basis ensured that those in need had support and a friend who could be relied upon. Her fund raising efforts are legendary, the Ship Inn Fun Race being among the best known. Her home was like a warehouse, storing materials and supplies donated and directed for the use of those in need. Up to almost age 90 she could be seen daily, driving herself across the country to assist the needy. Embraced and loved by two countries as their own, Olga was above all else a humanitarian who put the needs of the needy before her own. She died in her second homeland in February 2011.Olga Lopes-Seale was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1997.
Rafiq Khan
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Rafiq Khan

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Tribute to CBU Hall of Famer Rafiq Khan: 1932 – 2014 In December of 2014 the broadcasting sector and the Caribbean lost one of its brightest lights, CBU Hall of Famer and regional broadcasting stalwart, Mr. Rafiq Khan. The former announcer, media manager and development practitioner died in Jamaica, after a short illness. Mr. Khan joined the media in his homeland of Guyana when he was just a teenager, and rose through the ranks to become Program Director of the pre-independence Radio Demerara. He continued to demonstrate his talent on air and in leadership to eventually become General Manager of the successor station, the Guyana Broadcasting Company in 1970. Mr. Khan was present at the birth of the CBU in the same year and was an active proponent of its core mandate of regional integration through communication. His passion for the entire Caribbean was also evident in his technical support for the Rediffusion Group of Companies throughout the 1970s. Mr. Khan then went on to expand the scope of his support to broadcasting and the entire region when he was appointed UNESCO’s first ever Communication Advisor for the Caribbean, a position he held for thirteen (13) years. This position enabled him to provide technical assistance and advice to the CBU as a whole, and more specifically to individual member systems of the organisation, principally in the area of training. His service to media and the region also included academia, as a lecturer at the University of the West Indies, where he co-authored research papers on media and communication in the Caribbean. Even after retirement Mr. Khan continued to share the wealth of his experience and expertise as an international media consultant. Mr. Khan was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.
Raymond Smith
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Raymond Smith

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Mr. Smith, a Grenadian, was recognized for his service to the establishment of the CBU in 1970, and steering the Union in its early years. Mr. Smith, who was the long-standing Chief Engineer of the Windward Islands Broadcasting Service, also was hailed for innovations in broadcast engineering, including devising a new form of studio sound-proofing using natural material, which was adopted by broadcast operations as far away as the Pacific Islands.
Rose Willock, O.B.E.
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Rose Willock, O.B.E.

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Rose Willock’s service to the region, especially in building capacity for emergency broadcasting, is notable and praiseworthy. It must be noted that Mrs. Willock’s career has been marked by her time as Head of the English Service of Radio Antilles in the aftermath of the devastation by Hurricane Hugo in 1989, as well as her recognition on the Queen’s Honours Lists in 1986 and 1996 with an M.B.E. and an O.B.E. respectively.
Sir Trevor McDonald
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Sir Trevor McDonald

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Sir Trevor McDonald is a native of Trinidad and Tobago, born August 1939. After working as a print and broadcast journalist in Trinidad during the 1960s, in 1969 he joined the BBC World Service, and four years later moved to ITV. During his long association with Independent Television News, he was first a general reporter, and then later a sports correspondent, but ultimately concentrating on international politics. In the 1980s he spent some time with Channel 4 News but returned to ITN in 1989, presenting the early-evening news. McDonald was promoted in 1992 to sole presenter of News at Ten and became a well-known face on British television screens eventually being voted Newscaster of the Year and Most Trusted TV Personality. From 1992 to 2005 McDonald hosted ITV’s flagship current affairs programme Tonight with Trevor McDonald. Several universities, including the University of the West Indies, have conferred honorary doctoral degrees on him. He holds honorary degrees from the University of Plymouth and Liverpool John Moores University. In 1993, he was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s honours list and he received a knighthood in 1999 for his services to journalism. He was awarded a BAFTA fellowship at the 2011 British Academy Television Awards. Sir Trevor McDonald was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2005.
Stewart Krohn II
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Stewart Krohn II

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Stewart Krohn moved to Belize from the United States in the 1980s. In 1982 he established a small independent video company, Great Belize Productions, which produced indigenous content for “pirate” television stations. After a decade as a producer, he moved to establish Belize’s first indigenous television station, to offer local content to Belizean audiences on a consistent basis. He applied for and received a television license in 1991, forming Channel 5. He was President of the CBU from 1999 to 2011 and sat on the Board of the Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC) from its establishment in 2000. He has been honoured regionally and internationally for his work. In May 1999 he scored News 5’s third award from CNN World Report for a story on locally grown coffee. Stewart Krohn was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2011.
Tony Cozier
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Tony Cozier

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Winston Anthony Cozier, better known as “Tony” Cozier, was born July 10, 1940 in Bridgetown, Barbados.He studied journalism at Ottawa University and has been a cricket writer since 1958. His first experience as a cricket commentator was in 1960 at Queen’s Park Oval when he was asked by Radio 610 in Trinidad and Tobago to identify the new Barbados players in a regional game.His first Test Match commentary on radio was during the West Indies v Australia game in 1965. He has also been a member of the BBC’s Test Match Special commentary team and the Sky Sports West Indian Cricket commentary team. He has also commentated for Channel Nine in Australia. He has since become the “unmistakable voice of West Indies cricket”.He is regarded by many across the globe as the pre eminent cricket broadcaster in the world and his career has spanned many decades and all media. He has mastered the art of the written word as a long standing cricket writer, been the voice of cricket radio broadcasting and later emerged as one of the finest television cricket broadcasters working for the finest in the industry, including the BBC. Few can claim similar.He has done commentary in every major cricket-playing country in the world and is sought after and respected worldwide.He wrote the definitive “The West Indies: 50 Years of Test Cricket” (published 1978) and was editor of The West Indies Cricket Annual for all of its 22 editions.As a tribute to his contributions to cricket, the Press Box at the Kensington Oval in Barbados has been named after him. In December 2011, he was awarded honorary life membership of the MCC for his contribution to cricket.Tony Cozier was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1997.
Terence “Terry” Holder
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Terence “Terry” Holder

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The late Terence “Terry” Holder is recognized as being instrumental to the birth of the region’s first ever television news exchange, “Caribvision” as well as the regional television magazine, “Caribscope”.In the recount of his service to Caribbean media, it must be highlighted that he was the only person ever to hold both the positions of President and Secretary General of the CBU.
Vic Fernandes
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Vic Fernandes

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Vic Fernandes’ career in broadcasting, which began when he was only 17 years old, has spanned both public and private sector media. He rose to the position of deputy General Manager of the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation, before heading Starcom Network’s predecessor, the Barbados Rediffusion Group.After 2006 when One Caribbean Media was formed he became CEO of the OCM Network coordinating the thrust of OCM in acquiring stations in the Eastern Caribbean and creating the Caribbean SuperStation network, a first for the region.Mr Fernandes was the longest serving President of the CBU, having held the post from 1991 to 1999 and again from 2003 until 2013 when he retired as CEO of the OCM Network. During his tenure as President of the CBU he was recognised for the introduction of hallmark events such as the annual Caribbean Broadcasting Awards in 1995, the establishment of the CBU satellite uplink, the CBU Hall of Fame,the second and third agreements with the Freidrich Ebert Stiftung as well as his leadership as the first Chairman of CBU’s commercial arm, the Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC) established in 2000, and to whose formation he was instrumental.He has also provided professional advice and training to stations in St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica and Belize.He was awarded the Silver Crown of Merit in the 2014 Barbados Independence Awards for, his “invaluable contribution made over the last forty years in the radio and television industry.”Vic Fernandes was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2004.

 

Tribute to CBU Hall of Famer Rafiq Khan: 1932 – 2014In December of 2014 the broadcasting sector and the Caribbean lost one of its brightest lights, CBU Hall of Famer and regional broadcasting stalwart, Mr. Rafiq Khan.  The former announcer, media manager and development practitioner died in Jamaica, after a short illness.
Mr. Khan joined the media in his homeland of Guyana when he was just a teenager, and rose through the ranks to become Program Director of the pre-independence Radio Demerara.  He continued to demonstrate his talent on air and in leadership to eventually become General Manager of the successor station, the Guyana Broadcasting Company in 1970.
Mr. Khan was present at the birth of the CBU in the same year and was an active proponent of its core mandate of regional integration through communication.  His passion for the entire Caribbean was also evident in his technical support for the Rediffusion Group of Companies throughout the 1970s.
Mr. Khan then went on to expand the scope of his support to broadcasting and the entire region when he was appointed UNESCO’s first ever Communication Advisor for the Caribbean, a position he held for thirteen (13) years. This position enabled him to provide technical assistance and advice to the CBU as a whole, and more specifically to individual member systems of the organisation, principally in the area of training.
His service to media and the region also included academia, as a lecturer at the University of the West Indies, where he co-authored research papers on media and communication in the Caribbean. Even after retirement Mr. Khan continued to share the wealth of his experience and expertise as an international media consultant.
Mr. Khan was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.Hugh Cholmondeley
The late Hugh Cholmondeley could be considered the father of the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU). He entered the media profession in 1958 at the then British Guiana Broadcasting Service as an announcer. There, he showed great skill in learning all facets of his job including both announcing and operating skills, which classified him as “the first and original DJ” according to his eulogist Nigel Hughes.
From 1966-1968 he served as Director of News and Current Affairs  at Radio Demerara and in 1968 he became the first General Manager of the competitor Guyana Broadcasting Service (GBS).
During his time at GBS, he worked diligently to help establish the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU) to bring the region closer together through joint and shared programming by radio and television stations.  Due in large part to his efforts, the CBU was officially inaugurated in November 1970 in Georgetown, Guyana and he was appointed the first ever director general, a post later renamed Secretary General. The early emphasis was on radio in the Caribbean. Apart from the numerous training programmes for Caribbean broadcasters, Cholmondeley also led teams to produce two memorable series of programmes: Project One: documentaries on individual CARICOM member countries and Project Two: one-on-one interviews with sitting Heads of Government.
He expanded the remit and output of the CBU from offices at the CARICOM Secretariat in Georgetown Guyana, and doubled this effort with a special CARICOM project to promote a food and nutrition strategy developed by the integration movement to boost regional food production and reduce the regional food import bill.
In 1972 he was appointed Project Manager of UNESCO where he designed and established the Caribbean News Agency (CANA) and the Caribbean Institute of Mass Communications (CARIMAC) at the University of the West Indies (UWI).
In 1977 he was transferred to UNESCO Paris as a Programme Specialist where he designed and administered communications and development projects for the establishment and expansion of news agencies in developing countries.
In 1979 he became UNESCO’S representative to the Caribbean, and established his office in Jamaica where he functioned until 1985, when he was instrumental in forming the Consortium Graduate School in the Social Sciences in the Caribbean, a multi-university enterprise comprising University of the West Indies, University of Guyana and University of Suriname.
He changed UN hats in 1985 and joined the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), serving firstly in Jamaica and then in New York, where his accomplishments included assisting in peace making and rehabilitation initiatives in trouble spots – Somalia and Liberia – and  he also played a key role in relief efforts in Jamaica when the island was decimated by Hurricane Gilbert.  He was also a member of election observer missions in countries including Trinidad and Tobago and even his homeland Guyana.
Hugh Cholmondeley was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.Dwight Whylie
Dwight Whylie was born in Kingston Jamaica in 1936.  In 1961, he was the first announcer of colour to be hired by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for its domestic services.
Upon his return home after more than a decade of service in the UK, he took up the position of manager of the Jamaican Broadcasting Corporation (JBC) from 1973 to 1976.
In 1977 he became the first black announcer to be employed full-time by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation where he worked for twenty (20) years.  For more than a decade he was the editor of the national radio news for the CBC, only breaking that appointment to take up a year-long fellowship at the University of Chicago.
He also made a significant contribution to the profession as a broadcasting techniques and journalism trainer throughout the Caribbean.  He served as Vice President of the Caribbean Broadcasting Union, the Caribbean Advertisers Association and the Caribbean Publishing and Broadcasting Association.  His service to the CBU also included acting as Chief Judge for the Caribbean Broadcasting Awards on many occasions.
He became Chairman of the Broadcasting Commission in his homeland Jamaica, and presided over the launch of the first ever indigenously researched and formulated comprehensive set of content standards for broadcast and cable services in the region, the Children’s Code for Programming.  He served as Chairman of the Commission until his death in September 2002.
Dwight Whylie was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.Alva Clarke
St. Lucian by birth, Alva Clarke began his broadcasting career in 1954 as a programme assistant and later as Deputy Programme Director and News Editor with the Windward Islands Broadcasting Service (WIBS) in Grenada when it was launched in 1954.
Clarke’s entry into broadcasting followed a stint in print journalism as a Sports Editor and political reporter with the Voice newspaper in St. Lucia.
Broadcasting took him to London where he freelanced with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) following which he returned to the Caribbean and became the Federal Broadcasting Officer of the West Indies Federation. He spent a year in this position and then travelled to Ethiopia in 1959 where he served as a Broadcast Adviser to the government there. He returned from the turbulence which befell that country to the BBC in London in 1961 as a producer, and was elevated to the position of senior producer, assuming responsibility for the BBC‘s daily short wave transmission to the region, “London Calling the Caribbean”.
He was seconded by the BBC to organise the 8th biennial conference of the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association (CBA) in Jamaica in 1970 which proved to be an auspicious occasion for the CBU, as it was at that particular meeting that the CBU came into existence.  Clarke would also become Secretary General of the CBA that year, a post he would hold for 22 years during which he travelled to all the continents of the world serving broadcasting organisations in 51 countries.
Clarke was an eager supporter of Caribbean regional integration paying close attention to the media’s possible contribution to the movement, endorsing and supporting the proposal made in 1969 for the formation of an association of Caribbean broadcasters.
In the very early 1990’s following his tenure with the CBA, Clarke took a relatively brief respite from the United Kingdom to return to his native St. Lucia as General Manager of the St. Lucia Broadcasting Corporation. After a short stint as head of the national broadcaster of his homeland he returned to London where he died in 1994.
Throughout his life Clarke remained a loyal friend, adviser and supporter of the Union – ensuring the CBU Annual General Assembly was on his calendar for attendance no matter which corner of the world he was – advocating the interests of the Caribbean broadcasting and channelling assistance for its advancement.
Alva Clarke was inducted posthumously into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1996.Tony Cozier
Winston Anthony Cozier, better known as “Tony” Cozier, was born July 10, 1940 in Bridgetown, Barbados.
He studied journalism at Ottawa University and has been a cricket writer since 1958.  His first experience as a cricket commentator was in 1960 at Queen’s Park Oval when he was asked by Radio 610 in Trinidad and Tobago to identify the new Barbados players in a regional game.
His first Test Match commentary on radio was during the West Indies v Australia game in 1965.  He has also been a member of the BBC’s Test Match Special commentary team and the Sky Sports West Indian Cricket commentary team. He has also commentated for Channel Nine in Australia. He has since become the “unmistakable voice of West Indies cricket”.
He is regarded by many across the globe as the pre eminent cricket broadcaster in the world and his career has spanned many decades and all media. He has mastered the art of the written word as a long standing cricket writer, been the voice of cricket radio broadcasting and later emerged as one of the finest television cricket broadcasters working for the finest in the industry, including the BBC. Few can claim similar.
He has done commentary in every major cricket-playing country in the world and is sought after and respected worldwide.
He wrote the definitive “The West Indies: 50 Years of Test Cricket” (published 1978) and was editor of The West Indies Cricket Annual for all of its 22 editions.
As a tribute to his contributions to cricket, the Press Box at the Kensington Oval in Barbados has been named after him.  In December 2011, he was awarded honorary life membership of the MCC for his contribution to cricket.
Tony Cozier was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1997.Olga Lopes-Seale
Dame Olga Lopes-Seale was born in Guyana on December 26, 1918.
In 1952 she started full-time radio broadcasting with Radio Demerara where she was the first Guyanese woman to become a news anchor.
Her warm and friendly voice along with her caring personality made her extremely successful with programmes such as “Yours Truly, Olga”, as well as her Children’s Talent Shows. She also launched the Radio Demerara Needy Children’s Fund. This fund sought to meet the needs of poor children across Guyana.
She moved to Barbados in 1963 and became synonymous with community broadcasting at Barbados Radio Rediffusion.  There she launched the Rediffusion Needy Children’s Fund.  She also became known for her Saturday morning children’s radio programme where many a talent was born and cultivated.
In 1961 Olga was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire for her humanitarian work and for her contribution to broadcasting in Guyana.  In 2005 she was made a Dame of St. Andrew in the Barbados Independent Honours for extraordinary and outstanding achievement and merit in service to Barbados and humanity at large.
While Olga was known and respected as a world class broadcaster, it was her work with the poor and indigent, her indefatigable spirit that resonated with Barbadians, she and her small band of volunteers on a daily basis ensured that those in need had support and a friend who could be relied upon.
Her fund raising efforts are legendary, the Ship Inn Fun Race being among the best known. Her home was like a warehouse, storing materials and supplies donated and directed for the use of those in need. Up to almost age 90 she could be seen daily, driving herself across the country to assist the needy.
Embraced and loved by two countries as their own, Olga was above all else a humanitarian who put the needs of the needy before her own. She died in her second homeland in February 2011.
Olga Lopes-Seale was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 1997.Jones P. Madeira
ones P. Madeira was born in the east Trinidad town of Arima in 1944.  He began his career as an amateur broadcaster with the Voice of Rediffusion, a wired radio channel of the Trinidad Broadcasting Company which also operated the Radio Trinidad station. His first professional position in journalism was in the print media as a reporter with the Trinidad Publishing Company, publishers of the Guardian newspapers.
He entered broadcasting full-time as a News Editor/Reporter with the state-owned National Broadcasting Service.  From there he received a fellowship and became a producer with the Overseas Regional Services of the BBC, broadcasting out of Bush House, London. Madeira returned home and re-joined NBS 610 as Senior Producer, News and Current Affairs, and along with a team of young broadcasters, introduced and produced a range of news and current affairs initiatives
In 1976, he moved on to the position of Adviser in Media Relations and Public Information at the Secretariat of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), and part of a UNESCO team, headed by CBU founder, Hugh Cholmondeley, responsible for promoting the Caribbean integration movement. Their work included the further development of the Caribbean News Agency (CANA) and the Caribbean Broadcasting Union (CBU), and the expansion of the cooperation of electronic media houses in the Caribbean in the areas of programme production and exchanges, engineering and broadcast training. After five years in this position, Madeira assumed the position as the first full-time Secretary General of the CBU from 1981 to 1982.
After a short stint in the state sector, he re-entered mass media as Head of News and Current Affairs of Trinidad and Tobago Television (TTT).  In July 1990 he became a key hostage during an attempted coup in Trinidad and Tobago having firstly to announce the insurgency to the national population with gunmen and the leader of the militants at his side on the set, and subsequently, having to undertake a number of appearances to keep the country abreast. During his tenure at the TTT, he pioneered several major regional broadcast projects as a member of the Board of the CBU, including the CARIBVISION Project which undertook daily satellite exchanges among regional television systems, live productions of major events in many Caribbean capitals, and the CARIBSCOPE Television Magazine, which became the prototype of a transcription television program exchange in the Caribbean.
Following TTT, he again diversified his career by becoming Manager, News and Current Affairs and Caribbean Relations of the Trinidad Broadcasting Company, and Editor in Chief of the Trinidad Publishing Company Limited. He resigned his position as Editor in Chief of the Guardian newspapers along with the majority of his Senior Editorial Team during a confrontation with the government and publishers over freedom of the press, and became one of the pioneers of a new but now defunct newspaper, the Independent.
He then moved into public health communication, serving as Information Adviser at the Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC). After almost a decade in that position, he moved to the position as Manager/Adviser of the Communication Unit of the Trinidad and Tobago Ministry of Health, and subsequently became Court Protocol and Information Manager of the Judiciary of Trinidad and Tobago.
In 2014 he assumed the post of Editor-in-Chief at the daily newspaper Newsday.
Jones P. Madeira was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2000.Ken Gordon
Kenneth “Ken” Gordon, born in 1930, was the first black radio announcer in Trinidad and Tobago and, soon after, the first native-born Programme Director at Radio Trinidad.
He became the first black president of the Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1960. His entrepreneurial ability was applied to reconstruct a number of Caribbean newspapers.  He eventually became the managing director of Trinidad Express Newspaper in 1969, considered the first truly indigenous national newspaper in Trinidad and Tobago.
He had conceptual and nurturing roles in the formation of regional media institutions, most notably the Caribbean News Agency.
He was instrumental in introducing the first private television station in the English Caribbean, CCN TV6, and Prime Radio, in 1991.  This company later joined Barbados Nation Corporation Group to create One Caribbean Media Limited in 2006.
Recognition for his service to the media has come from numerous regional and international bodies including The Pedro Joaquin Chamorro Award In 1983 from the Inter American Press Association; The Commonwealth Press Union Lord Astor Award In 1985 and the Media Association of Trinidad And Tobago’s Service Recognition Award in 1997.
Ken Gordon was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2000.Vic Fernandes
Vic Fernandes’ career in broadcasting, which began when he was only 17 years old, has spanned both public and private sector media.  He rose to the position of deputy General Manager of the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation, before heading Starcom Network’s predecessor, the Barbados Rediffusion Group.
After 2006 when One Caribbean Media was formed he became CEO of the OCM Network coordinating the thrust of OCM in acquiring stations in the Eastern Caribbean and creating the Caribbean SuperStation network, a first for the region.
Mr Fernandes was the longest serving President of the CBU, having held the post from 1991 to 1999 and again from 2003 until 2013 when he retired as CEO of the OCM Network.  During his tenure as President of the CBU he was recognised for the introduction of hallmark events such as the annual Caribbean Broadcasting Awards in 1995, the establishment of the CBU satellite uplink, the CBU Hall of Fame,the second and third agreements with the Freidrich Ebert Stiftung as well as his leadership as the first Chairman of CBU’s commercial arm, the Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC) established in 2000, and to whose formation he was instrumental.
He has also provided professional advice and training to stations in St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica and Belize.
He was awarded the Silver Crown of Merit in the 2014 Barbados Independence Awards for, his “invaluable contribution made over the last forty years in the radio and television industry.”
Vic Fernandes was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2004.Sir Trevor McDonald
Sir Trevor McDonald is a native of Trinidad and Tobago, born August 1939.
After working as a print and broadcast journalist in Trinidad during the 1960s, in 1969 he joined the BBC World Service, and four years later moved to ITV. During his long association with Independent Television News, he was first a general reporter, and then later a sports correspondent, but ultimately concentrating on international politics. In the 1980s he spent some time with Channel 4 News but returned to ITN in 1989, presenting the early-evening news.
McDonald was promoted in 1992 to sole presenter of News at Ten and became a well-known face on British television screens eventually being voted Newscaster of the Year and Most Trusted TV Personality.  From 1992 to 2005 McDonald hosted ITV’s flagship current affairs programme Tonight with Trevor McDonald.
Several universities, including the University of the West Indies, have conferred honorary doctoral degrees on him. He holds honorary degrees from the University of Plymouth and Liverpool John Moores University.
In 1993, he was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s honours list and he received a knighthood in 1999 for his services to journalism. He was awarded a BAFTA fellowship at the 2011 British Academy Television Awards.
Sir Trevor McDonald was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2005.Stewart Krohn
Stewart Krohn moved to Belize from the United States in the 1980s.  In 1982 he established a small independent video company, Great Belize Productions, which produced indigenous content for “pirate” television stations.
After a decade as a producer, he moved to establish Belize’s first indigenous television station, to offer local content to Belizean audiences on a consistent basis.  He applied for and received a television license in 1991, forming Channel 5.
He was President of the CBU from 1999 to 2011 and sat on the Board of the Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC) from its establishment in 2000.
He has been honoured regionally and internationally for his work. In May 1999 he scored News 5’s third award from CNN World Report for a story on locally grown coffee.
Stewart Krohn was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2011.Lester Spalding
J.A. Lester Spalding was born in Jamaica on April 1, 1941.  His career in broadcasting is associated with the Jamaica Broadcasting Company, then renamed Radio Jamaica and Rediffusion Limited and subsequently Radio Jamaica Limited which eventually became the parent company of the RJR Communication Group.
Starting in accounts, he became Managing Director in 1978, a position from which he retired in 2008.  He has been Chairman of the Radio Jamaica Group since 1994.
He was president of the CBU from 1987 to 1991.  During his term as President he formed a relationship with the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung which led to the establishment of a television production and news exchange facility including the CBU’s acquisition of its own domestic satellite uplink.
He also contributed to the development of the Caribbean News Agency (CANA) as a director until 2011, and nurtured the formation of the Caribbean Media Corporation being its inaugural Chairman in 2000.
Lester Spalding was inducted into the CBU Hall of Fame in 2011.